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Science as Art Competition Winners Announced

The UC Davis student chapter of the Materials Research Society (MRS) hosted their own Science as Art competition in Spring 2016. The contest was intended to celebrate informative visualizations of data that are also aesthetically appealing.  Pictured here are the UC Davis contest winners, “Defect Etching in Gallium Nitride” by Steven Zhang, “Cobalt Nanowires” by Daniel Dryden, and “Femtosecond Laser Super Continuum Generation” by Javier Rueda. These winning images will be featured in the MSE faculty office area in Kemper Hall, and all other entries will be posted outside of AMCaT in the basement of Kemper Hall.  Thanks for all those submitted entries! Check out the national MRS competition winners at http://www.mrs.org/science-as-art/.

Defect Etching in Gallium Nitride by Steven Zhang

SEM micrograph of gallium nitride etched in boiling phosphoric acid for 9 minutes. Strain field around dislocations lead to enhanced dissolution rate which allows surfaces to be patterned and dislocation densities estimated in epitaxially grown films.

SEM micrograph of gallium nitride etched in boiling phosphoric acid for 9 minutes. Strain field around dislocations lead to enhanced dissolution rate which allows surfaces to be patterned and dislocation densities estimated in epitaxially grown films.

Cobalt Nanowires by Daniel Dryden

A cobalt film grown via electrodeposition; a large crack exposes the Au-coated polycarbonate substrate below. A cobalt film grown via electrodeposition; a large crack exposes the Au-coated polycarbonate substrate below.

A cobalt film grown via electrodeposition; a large crack exposes the Au-coated polycarbonate substrate below.

Femtosecond Laser Supercontinuum Generation by Javier Rueda

The last three decades have witnessed how femtosecond lasers have been proven to be powerful tools for a wide variety of technological applications, especially in the field of optics and photonics. This picture illustrates a colorful and a relatively simple example of supercontinuum generation in a non-linear material, which is intended to highlight the increasingly importance of ultrafast science and particularly the use of such light sources in technology and basic science.

The last three decades have witnessed how femtosecond lasers have been proven to be powerful tools for a wide variety of technological applications, especially in the field of optics and photonics. This picture illustrates a colorful and a relatively simple example of supercontinuum generation in a non-linear material, which is intended to highlight the increasingly importance of ultrafast science and particularly the use of such light sources in technology and basic science.