publications

Roopali Kukreja Reveals Two-Step Process in Magnetite’s Metal-Insulator Transition

November 15, 2018

A team of UC Davis researchers led by Assistant Professor Roopali Kukreja recently published their findings that magnetite’s transition between metal and insulator is a two-step process, instead of a one-step process like previously thought.

 

Magnetite is a unique material in that depending on temperature, it can either be a metal, which conducts electricity well, or an insulator, which does not. Kukreja’s team investigated this transition, theorizing that it has to do with the arrangement of the material’s electrons, and found this two-step process.

UC Davis nanoceramics research featured on ACerS website

July 12, 2018

UC Davis materials science and engineering research was featured on the American Ceramic Society (ACerS) website in a recent article. The study, led by doctoral student Arseniy Bokov in Ricardo Castro’s Nanoceramics Thermochemistry Lab, looked at grain boundaries in nanocrystalline ceramics with the goal of improving toughness. The mechanical stability of these materials is important for the performance of battery electrodes and capacitors.

Publication: The Evolution of Magnetic Domains

September 12, 2016

Soft x-ray photoemission electron microscopy was used to observe and characterize the evolution of magnetic domain structure as a function of temperature in micromagnets patterned into epitaxial films of La₀.₇Sr₀.₃MnO₃. These images reveal the formation of novel spin textures that are a hybridization of well-described configurations and emerge from the balance between fundamental materials parameters, micromagnet geometries, and epitaxial strain.

Subhash Mahajan publishes new article in MRS bulletin

November 30, 2015

Prof. Mahajan has published an article entitled “The role of materials science in the evolution of microelectronics” in the latest MRS Bulletin.  He writes on how materials science solved the critical challenges that allow us to use silicon as we do today and helped bring us into the Silicon Age (a riff off the ‘Bronze Age’ nomenclature, for the period more commonly known as the Information Age).