Research

Exploring Perovskites: A Conversation with Marina Leite

July 23, 2020

Though their optical and electrical properties are very promising, perovskites are a class of materials that are still understudied. Until researchers have a better understanding of their overall properties, they can’t learn how to control them to create ubiquitous devices like solar cells, LEDs and photodetectors.

Using “fun physics” to advance computing

June 01, 2020

Driven by the thrill of discovery, materials science and engineering professor Yayoi Takamura’s research group explores the “fun physics” of the magnetic and electronic properties of thin films of complex oxide materials to better understand how these materials that can be used in advanced computing.

Marina Leite co-authors new paper that standardizes perovskite stability testing

January 24, 2020

Associate professor Marina Leite is a co-author on a new paper in Nature Energy that establishes standards and procedures for testing the stability of perovskite photovoltaic devices. The publication, the result of the 12th International Summit on Organic Photovoltaic Stability (ISOS) in October 2019, was co-written by 60 leading researchers in the field from across the globe who came together to form this consensus.

UC Davis leads breakthrough in ceramic nanoscience

December 09, 2019

A new paper from professor Ricardo Castro’s group at UC Davis changes the understanding of how nanoscale dimensions affect the hardness of ceramics. The study, led by then Ph.D. student Arseniy Bokov, found that on nanoscale dimensions, ceramic materials give a false impression of softening because of an extensive network of almost invisible nanocracks.

Space Engineering at UC Davis

October 30, 2019

If space is the final frontier, UC Davis is taking giant leaps to reach it. With expertise in human-machine cooperation, control systems and materials under extreme conditions, the university aims to make itself a rising star in space engineering and play a crucial role in the next generation of space exploration.

Castro group paper highlighted by Materials Today

July 16, 2019

A publication from Professor Ricardo Castro’s group was highlighted on Materials Today. The team, consisting of Castro’s group and visiting postdoctoral scholar Flavio Souza, found that Chlorine alters electron spin in hematite, showing why the material underperformed expectations in photoelectrochemical cells and proving that spin mobility manipulation is possible.

Roopali Kukreja Reveals Two-Step Process in Magnetite’s Metal-Insulator Transition

November 15, 2018

A team of UC Davis researchers led by Assistant Professor Roopali Kukreja recently published their findings that magnetite’s transition between metal and insulator is a two-step process, instead of a one-step process like previously thought.

Magnetite is a unique material in that depending on temperature, it can either be a metal, which conducts electricity well, or an insulator, which does not. Kukreja’s team investigated this transition, theorizing that it has to do with the arrangement of the material’s electrons, and found this two-step process.

UC Davis nanoceramics research featured on ACerS website

July 12, 2018

UC Davis materials science and engineering research was featured on the American Ceramic Society (ACerS) website in a recent article. The study, led by doctoral student Arseniy Bokov in Ricardo Castro’s Nanoceramics Thermochemistry Lab, looked at grain boundaries in nanocrystalline ceramics with the goal of improving toughness. The mechanical stability of these materials is important for the performance of battery electrodes and capacitors.

MSE and ChemE hold 4th annual research symposium

November 07, 2016

The 4th Annual ChemE and MSE Research Symposium at UC Davis was held in Kemper Hall on Friday, Nov. 4th, 2016. The event featured nine oral presentations in the morning, and a poster session in the afternoon. All participants commented on the quality of the research being presented, as well as the enthusiastic attendance from both Departments.

Awards were given for the following categories:

Graduate Student Poster Grand Prize:
‘Aerosol Emission During Human Speech’
Sima Asadi, Chemical Engineering, Ristenpart Research Group